Past Lectures

Prevous lectures hosted by the Office of State Archaeology:


Archaeological Excavations at the Trogdon-Squirrel Creek Site

The first installment of the Archaeological Lecture Series, OSA hosted Brad Hatch of Dovetail Cultural Resources Group (Dovetail) and NC DOT Staff Archaeologists to discuss finds at the Trogdon-Squirrel Creek site (31RD1426) in Randolph County, North Carolina. Excavations focused on an early nineteenth-to early twentieth-century Quaker farmstead. This investigation resulted in the recovery of over 20,000 artifacts and revealed a dwelling with stone piers, an associated outbuilding, and cultural landscape features.

North Carolina State Library and Archives | 109 East Jones Street, Raleigh, NC

Monday, February 27, 2017 - 11:30 am

View the flier (pdf)

View the presentation slides (pdf)


Archaeobotany Methods and Research

Mary Beth Fitts of OSA discussed the specialization of archaeobotany (also known as paleoethnobotany), which focuses on the recovery, analysis, and interpretation of plant materials from archaeological sites. Because site formation processes and archaeological recovery methods play a large role in structuring what we find in archaeobotanical assemblages, it is important to understand how plant remains come to be preserved in the archaeological record, and what techniques are employed to ensure that they have the best chance of being identified in the laboratory.
 

North Carolina State Library and Archives Auditorium | 109 East Jones Street, Raleigh, NC

Monday, March 13, 2017 - 11:30 am

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View the presentation slides (pdf)


Crops Before Corn: An Investigation of Eastern Agricultural Complex Plants at the Tom Jones Site, Arkansas

Before corn, beans, and squash became the cornerstones of farming in the Eastern Woodlands, Native Americans relied on a different group of crops. The so-called “Eastern Agricultural Complex” consisted of several weedy plants, including sunflowers and a relative of the quinoa plant, that were domesticated and grown in the United States for thousands of years. Following the introduction of corn to the Eastern Woodlands these plants mostly disappeared from Native diets, and it has only been over the past few decades that archaeologists have rediscovered the existence of these important ancient crops. Through discussion of the Tom Jones site, a protohistoric Caddo Indian mound site in Arkansas, we can learn about these lost crops and explore their place in prehistoric foodways.

Presented by Rosie Blewitt

North Carolina State Library and Archives Auditorium | 109 East Jones Street, Raleigh, NC

Wednesday, April 5, 2017 - 11:30 am

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View the presentation slides (pdf)


Commerce and Conflict: Exploring North Carolina's Maritime Heritage

During the American Civil War, blockade runners played an invaluable role in keeping Confederate forces supplied with munitions and other goods. Members of North Carolina’s Underwater Archaeology Branch (UAB) are rediscovering some of these important pieces of history. The Agnes E. Fry, a relatively intact vessel that sank in 1864 near Oak Island, provides a unique opportunity to glimpse our maritime past. The Condor, which sank two months before the Agnes E. Fry while attempting to reach the port of Wilmington, is the world’s best preserved blockade runner and North Carolina’s first true Heritage Dive Site. Please join us as John “Billy Ray” Morris and Greg Stratton tell the story of these two ships and the important work done by the UAB to research and preserve North Carolina’s maritime heritage.

Presented by John William Morris III and Greg Stratton

North Carolina State Library and Archives Auditorium | 109 East Jones Street, Raleigh, NC

Wednesday, May 23, 2017 - 11:30 am

View the flier (pdf)