Office of State Archaeology

Who We Are

The Office of State Archaeology (OSA) serves North Carolina’s citizens through programs that identify archaeological resources on land and beneath state waters. OSA archaeologists and staff are specialists with decades of academic training and practical experience, which we apply to gather and share knowledge about the vast time range (more than 12,000 years) of North Carolina’s historic experience.

We protect the state’s legacy of Native American villages, colonial towns, farmsteads, and historic shipwrecks through application of state and federal archaeology laws and regulations, and by maintaining inventories of site data and artifact collections. OSA furnishes professional archaeology services to government agencies, museums, schools and the general public. Appreciation of our state’s cultural heritage enhances the social, educational, cultural and economic future of North Carolina.

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Meet Our Staff

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Upcoming Events

Lecture Series

Newest Lecture

Kimberly Kenyon shares why conservation is so critical to archaeology and some of the processes involved.

Submerged NC: Science of Conservation

Kimberly Kenyon, senior conservator for the Queen Anne’s Revenge Shipwreck Project, shares why conservation is so critical to archaeology and some of the processes involved. Discover that archaeology does not end once an artifact is unearthed. Learn how following excavation, an object may require months or years of conservation before it is stable enough for further research or exhibit. See why this is particularly true of artifacts from a marine environment, such as those submerged in the waters off North Carolina’s coast.

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Who's My Archaeologist?

View an interactive map with contact information for State Archaeologists assigned to different regions of North Carolina.

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Environmental Review

By law, we provide guidance to help the federal, state, and local governments plan projects that account for our state's archaeological heritage. 

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